Servicemen J-M

jennings-edwardJennings, Edward – born 1885, younger of two sons of John and Annie Jennings. In 1911 Edward was a card grinder living at 75 Crown Street, Bradford. The family later moved to Throstle Nest Farm, Cottingley. Edward served as Private No. 7244 in “A” Company, 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, first going into action on 13th August 1914, and died on 1st November 1914. He is commemorated at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.  Edward was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory medal and British War medal.

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Jennings, Harry – born 1884, son of John and Annie Jennings and brother of Edward (see above). In 1911 Harry was a mason’s labourer. Harry served as Private No. 32703 in the 7th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment and was killed in action on 27th July 1917. Harry is also commemorated at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial and was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

Kay, Harold Hodgson – born in 1878 in Manningham, son of John Kay, a stuff merchant, and his wife Margaret (nee Hodgson). In 1901 Harold was living with his brother Walter Ramsay Kay and his sister Laura Kay at Brookside, Cottingley. Walter and Harold were both woolcombers at this time. Walter Ramsay Kay was a director of W. R. Kay Limited at Cottingley Mills and was responsible for the plaque honouring the men of Cottingley who served in the First World War which is situated inside Cottingley Town Hall. In 1911 Harold was lodging, with several other families, at 25 Regents Square, London, where he was classified as being of “private means”. On 8th January 1914 Harold married Ida Reynard at Knaresborough. Their daughter, Laura, was born in 1915. At the age of 37 years and 8 months, Harold attested at Ripon on 12th December 1915. At this time Harold was living at 15 Caledonia Road, Leeds where he was a poultry farmer. Gunner 142997 Harold Hodgson Kay, Royal Garrison Artillery, was mobilised on 5th March 1917 and posted overseas on 24th July 1917. He served in 405 Siege Battery and returned to the UK for release on 5th February 1919. At various times in his military career, Harold’s home address was Burnand House, Forest Moor, Knaresborogh, 5 Roseville Road, Harrogate and Clay Hall Farm, Thwaites Brow, Keighley. Harold was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

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Keighley, SnowdenM. M.  – born 1888, son of James Keighley and his wife Betty (nee Snowden). In 1911 Snowden was a pin setter living at Crapps Hall, Wilsden. He served as Private 18/203 in the 18th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment and was later promoted to Lance Corporal in the 15/17th Battalion of the same regiment. Snowden’s first taste of action was in Egypt on 22nd December 1915. He died on 12th April 1918 and is commemorated at the Ploegsteert Memorial. Snowden was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory medal and British War medal. The following article appeared in the Bradford Argus of 22nd September 1917. Lance-Corpl. Snowden Keighley, of Wilsden, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in the front line, Mericourt sector, during an attempted enemy raid. Although wounded in the arm by the opening bombardment he remained at his post and kept up a persistent fire on the enemy with his Lewis gun, showing much pluck and coolness under heavy enemy fire. It was not until two hours afterwards, when everything was quiet, that he consented to leave his post to have his wound dressed. Lance-Corpl. Snowden Keighley belongs to the 18th P.W.O. West Yorkshire Regiment, and his officer and others speak in the highest terms of praise concerning his conduct

Kirby, Arthur – born 1887 in Barrowden, Rutlandshire, one of the eleven children of Thomas Kirby, a farm labourer, and his wife, Eliza (nee Lee). In 1908 Arthur, a farm servant, married Ellen Wilkinson. In 1911 they were living at 96 Woodhouse Grove, Sandy Lane at which time Arthur was a cotton weaver. Arthur served in the West Yorkshire Regiment and, at one time, was posted as missing.

Kirby, Charles – born 1879 in Barrowden, Rutlandshire, son of Thomas Kirby, a farm labourer, and his wife, Eliza (nee Lee). He was a farm servant of Ling Bob, Wilsden when he married Clara Whitaker on 20th May 1899. By the time of the 1901 Census they had a daughter, Edna, and Charles was a factory waggoner. Charles’ wife Clara died in 1909. In 1911 Charles was living at Stock-a-house Cottage, Cottingley.

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Kirby, Harold – born 1894 in Bradford, son of Thomas Kirby, a farm labourer, and his wife, Eliza (nee Lee). In 1911 he was a bobbin layer living at Stock-A-House Cottage. When he married Minnie Wharton at St. Barnabas’ Church, Heaton on 6th September 1918, Harold was a soldier whose residence was 100 Woodhouse Grove, Sandy Lane. The Bradford Daily Telegraph of 10th August 1916 reported: KIRBY, Pte. Harold. 2nd Bradford “Pals” has been dangerously wounded in the lung, and is now in hospital in France. He resided at Stockhouse Cottages, Sandy Lane, Bradford.

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Kirby, Willie – born 1892 in Bradford, son of Thomas Kirby, a farm labourer, and his wife, Eliza (nee Lee). He was a weaver and still living with his parents in 1911. Willie married Sarah Bowker in 1922. The Bradford Daily Telegraph of 17th November 1917 reported: KIRBY, Pte. Willie, of Sandy Lane, has been wounded in the right arm, and is now in hospital at Epsom.

Lancaster, M – Nothing is known about this person. However, it may have been John Lancaster who was living at 25 New Brighton in 1911 when he was a vise miller. John  was born at Shipley in 1892, son of William Myers Lancaster, a life assurance agent, and his wife Jane. On 26th December 1910 John married Ada Keighley at St. Michael & All Angels’ Church, Cottingley. After the war they lived at 17 Thompson Street, Shipley.

Lee, Fred – born 21st November 1896 at Cottingley, son of Harry Watson Lee and his wife Mary. In 1911 Fred was a butcher’s boy living at 7 Skirrow Street, Cottingley where he resided until 1925. In 1922 Fred married Edith Greenwood. From 1934 the family lived at 15 Smith Street, Cottingley for many years.

Lee, Harold Jonathan – born at Bingley on 7th July 1890, one of only four surviving out of nine children of James Lee, a stone mason, and his wife, Isabella (nee Rochester). On 4th July 1910, at the age of 19 years, Harold, a warp twister, married Isabella Willis at Bingley Parish Church. In 1911 Harold was a warp twister living at 19 Leonard Street, Bingley. In 1915 Harold was registered at 4 Town Hill Street, Cottingley and this is where he was residing immediately after the war. No trace has been found of Harold’s military service.

Lister, Norman – born at Keighley  in 1894, the only child of Fred Lister, a foreman blacksmith, and his wife Mary Ann (nee Holdsworth). Norman’s father died in 1903 and his mother married James Myers. In 1911 Norman, a dyer’s finisher, was living at 19 Lynwood Terrace, Cottingley.  On 16th October 1915 Norman, now a horse driver, married Elizabeth Topham at Bingley Parish Church. Their first son Edward was born the following year. Norman attested at Bingley on 12th December 1915 but was not called up until 6th June 1918. Private 60074 Norman Lister was posted to the 3rd Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment and was sent overseas on 1st October 1918. Norman was later transferred to the 9th Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment. He returned to England for demobilization on 21st February 1919. Norman was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. Norman’s second son, Kenneth Holdsworth Lister, was killed in the Second World War (15th September 1943) and is commemorated at the Salerno War Cemetery.

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Lund, Percy Smith – also known as Percy Lund Smith – born on 3rd January 1890 at Cottingley, son of Annie Rebecca Lund. In 1891 Percy and his mother were living with Annie’s parents and brother at Stock-a-close, Cottingley. In 1891 Percy’s mother married Henry Smith. In 1911 Percy was a warehouse worker living at 30 Hollings Street, Cottingley. In September 1915 Percy married Hannah Gladys Feather at Saltaire Wesleyan Church. Prior to the outbreak of war, Percy had been a member of the Shipley detachment of the West Riding Field Ambulance. Percy was appointed Corporal in the Royal Army Medical Corps with regimental No. 1572. Percy was posted to France on 16th April 1915 and there he stayed until June 1917. He was recommended for a commission and trained at the Cadet School at Bath. On 30th April 1918 Percy was appointed 2nd Lieutenant with the Durham Light Infantry. Percy was awarded the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the 1915 Star.

Marsh, Arthur Edward – born 14th October 1896 at Malton, son of Samuel Edward Marsh (see below) and his wife Emily (nee Smith). In 1911 Arthur was a farm labourer living at Wath House, Hovingham. He was a stone quarryman when, on 9th September 1914 (under age), he enlisted in the Roayl Naval Volunteer Reserve. He served until 7th March 1919 although he does not appear to have seen active service. On 18th April 1918 Arthur married Blanche Harrison. After the war the family residence was at 16 Main Street, Cottingley.

Marsh, Samuel Edward – born @ 1876 in London, Samuel married Emily Smith in 1896. In 1911, when Samuel was a general dealer, the family lived at Swinton, Malton. After the war their residence was at 16 Main Street, Cottingley. Samuel died in 1945.

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Metcalfe, Norman Sutton born 1898, a son of Samuel and Bessie Metcalfe. In 1911 the family were living at 11 Lock View, Bingley. He had attended Bingley Grammar School and was a professional musician – a cello player – at the Dewsbury Empire Theatre. Norman was a private – No. 268341 – in 2/6th Battalion, West Riding Regiment and was killed in action on 3rd May 1917. He is commemorated at the Arras Memorial. Norman was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Norman’s name also appears on the Rolls Of Honour of Bingley Grammar school and St. Paul’s Church, Shipley.

Middleton, Joseph Irving – born 30th October 1894, son of Walter and Alice Middleton (nee Clarkson). In 1911 Joseph was a farm pupil at Brooke, Norfolk. He worked for his father at Cottingley Bridge before enlisting in the Hertfordshire Yeomanry on 20th October 1914. In February 1916 he was appointed Shoeing Smith and in December 1917 was posted to France. He was later transferred to Egypt where, in October 1918, he contacted malaria and dysentry. In February 1919 he returned home and spent some time in a Liverpool hospital before being discharged on 29th March 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He returned to live at Cottingley Bridge House then, in 1923, he  married Flora Stenning. Joseph died in 1975.

Middleton, Maurice Broderick – born 29th May 1892, son of Walter and Alice Middleton (nee Clarkson). In 1911 he was still at school and living at Cottingley Bridge, his father’s home. Nothing is known about his military service.

Middleton, Walter – born 29th August 1887, son of  Walter and Alice Middleton (nee Clarkson). In 1911 he was a junior inspector with an insurance company, living at 7 St. Michael Square, Chapleltown, Leeds. On 18th October 1918, when he enlisted in the Royal Air Force, he was a surveyor and clerk. He served in the RAF as a fitter of aero engines until 27th February 1919.

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Miller, John William – born about 1874, little is known about John’s origins or early life other than he was born at Fewston. On 17th November 1894 John married Emily Watson. John and Emily subsequently had seven children. In 1911 John was a waller – mason, living at 2 Huntley Street, Valley Road, Shipley. Private 154970 John William Miller enlisted on 18th April 1918 and attested at Halifax on 2nd July 1918 at the age of 44 years and 56 days. He was immediately posted to the 7th Battalion of the Royal Army Medical Corps and sent to Blackpool. On 6th September 1918 John was posted for duty at Queen Mary’s Military Hospital, Whalley. He was demobilised on 16th April 1919. After the war the family home was at 17 New Brighton. John died at 6 New Brighton on 20th November 1956.

Milnes, Harold Carr born 1891 at Elloughton, son of Alfred and Annie Elizabeth Milnes. In 1911 Harold was a gardener boarding at 2 Skirrow Street, Cottingley. Harold was a private (No. 16/1267) in the 16th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, first going into action in Egypt on 22nd December 1915. He was killed in action on 27th August 1917 and was buried at the Cement House Cemetery, Belgium. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory medal and British War medal.

Moore, Alfred – born at Cottingley on 15th July 1883, the son of John Moore, a butcher, and his wife Martha. In 1911 Alfred was a butcher living at 7 Town Hill Street, Cottingley.  Private 5199 Alfred Moore attested at Bingley on 7th December 1915. Alfred was originally posted to the 7th Battalion of the Duke Of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment and mobilised on 13th July 1916. On 18th October he was posted to France and joined the 34th Infantry Base Depot at Etaples. On 16th November 1916 Alfred was transferred to the 9th Battalion of the Duke Of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment and allocated service no. 24573. On 10th January 1919 Alfred was admitted to the 3rd Australian Field Hospital at Abbeville with fractured ribs. He rejoined his battalion on 27th January 1919 and returned to England for release on 4th February 1919. Alfred was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.  After the war Alfred’s home was 26 Smith Street, Cottingley.

Morris, Fred – born at Cottingley in 1881, son of William Morris, a worsted weaver, and his wife, Mary (nee Hutchinson). In 1911 Fred was an iron moulder living at 10 Strand, Cottingley with his wife Annie.

Morris, George – born in 1884, son of William Morris, a worsted weaver, and his wife, Mary (nee Hutchinson). He married Emily Holdsworth on 13th April 1910. In 1911  George was a coal merchant living at 50 Hollings Street, Cottingley. George and Emily subsequently settled at 15 Smith Street, Cottingley.

Mountain, Frank – born on 5th August 1893, the oldest of five children of Samuel Mountain, a brewer of Queen’s Road, Shipley, and his wife Martha (nee Hare). In 1911 Frank was a brewer’s labourer, living at  Brewery Cottage, Bingley. On 29th November 1913, he married Bertha Smith. A son, Samuel, was born the following year. After the war the family home was at 5 Skirrow Street, Cottingley for a few years before moving to 34 Smith Street, Cottingley then The Bungalows, Cottingley.

Murgatroyd, Denby – lived at 28 Smith Street, Cottingley after the war.

Myers, George Arthur – born at Cottingley on 2nd July 1897, the son of James Myers, a stone mason, and his wife, Margaret (nee Dinsdale). In 1911 George was a worsted spinner living at 19 Lynwood Terrace, Cottingley. George attested at Bradford on 2nd September 1914 and subsequently served as Private 11646 in the 8th Battalion of the West Riding Regiment. On attestation, George’s occupation was a motor assistant. George served in the Balkans from 2nd July 1915 until 26th October 1915 although his record was not spotless prior to being posted abroad. Twice George was absent from operations for two days and received appropriate punishment. On 11th May 1916 George was discharged due to being wounded – he had a finger amputated – and he was issued with a Silver War Badge. He was also awarded the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the 1915 Star. On 8th September 1917 George married Margaret Webb.